About SPN SPN Programs SPN Projects SPN Forums Join SPN


Sustainability Practice Network: 2013-14 Meeting Program

September 13, 2013
Ride On NYC CitiBike Share Panel

October 15, 2013
Urban Redevelopment – How the Eco-District Model Can Drive Economic Growth

November 19, 2013
New York City's Road to Resiliency

February 18, 2014
Environmental Policy Predictions NYC 2014

April 16, 2014
The Tale of Two Cities: Turning Rhetoric into Reality

April 25, 2013
Slow Money Panel Discussion: Anatomy of a Deal: Financing Sustainable Food



September 17 2013, 6-8 pm
..........................................................................................................................................
Ride On NYC CitiBike Share Panel
..........................................................................................................................................

Venue: Baruch College's Library Building, 151 E 25th Street (between Lex and 3rd), Room 750

Confirmed Panelists: Justin Ginsburg, Project Director, Alta; Charles Komanoff, Komanoff Energy Associates

Invited Panelists: John Orcott, Policy Director NYC DOT; Valerie Smith Director, Corporate Sustainability at Citi; Hillary Brown, Director NS Program in Sustainability CUNY

Moderator: TBA

Video Ride On: NYC's CitiBike Share Program Video

In May 2013, after nearly two years of planning and intensive public input, the much-anticipated New York City bike sharing program, sponsored primarily by Citi and thus named Citi Bike, launched with roughly 6000 bicycles and 600 docking stations in Midtown, Lower Manhattan and West Brooklyn with plans to expand further north and east. Operated by NYC Bike Share LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Alta Bicycle Share, Citi Bike is the most high-profile bike sharing program in the US and, arguably, the world, joining existing systems in Hangzhou, Mexico City, London, Washington, D.C., Boston, Melbourne, Toronto, Ottawa, and Montreal and many others.

In the few months since its launch, the program has added 65,000 annual members and hosted over 1.5 million cumulative trips, with daily trips increasing from roughly 6,000 at launch to over 40,000 by the end of July, capturing the attention of city planners, commuters and environmentalists across the country. Yet, many city residents are still not convinced whether Citi Bike will benefit the city as a whole and not just a small segment of the population.

Advocates expect the program to improve commute times, lessen crowding on public transportation and reduce congestion and pollution from New York 's streets. According to New York City 's Department of Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan, the program will generate approximately $36 million in economic activity and create 170 new jobs in the first year.

What are the long- and short-term implications of the Citi Bike program for New Yorkers' health, wealth and happiness? Will New York be changed forever, while leading a nationwide turn toward bicycle commuting? Can the program survive without its heavy corporate subsidies? How will the program affect the real estate market? What are the next steps in this commuting rediscovery?

Please RSVP events@sustainabilitypractice.net

Back to the Top
October 15 2013, 6-8 pm
..........................................................................................................................................
Urban Redevelopment –
How the Eco-District Model Can Drive Economic Growth

..........................................................................................................................................
Host
NYU / Stern Social Enterprise Association

Venue: Vanderbilt Hall Room 214 at NYU Law, 40 Washington Square South

Confirmed Panelists: Michelle Canizio; Chief of Sustainability Initiatives, NYCHA; Margaret Jolly, Distributed Generation Ombudsman, Con Edison; Tria Case, University Director of Sustainability, City University of New York ; Cameron Thomson, Sustainability Consultant, Arup; Nathan Taft, Director of Acquisitions, Jonathan Rose Companies;

Invited Panelists: Jake Baker Assistant Vice President, Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management; Daniel Hernandez, Managing Director of Rose Urban Solutions, Jonathon Rose Company;

Moderator: Llewellyn Wells, Founder - Living City Block, Co-Founder - Urban Energy Systems Corporation

Despite the increasing interest in climate change, green building, and sustainability, the redevelopment community continues to struggle with integrating environmentally sensitive features into the built environment. Stakeholders find it difficult to define and adopt what proves to be a complex and costly arena, let alone quantify and report on the effectiveness of sustainability metrics.

Case studies from around the world have shown that eco-districts reap economic and financial gains. In addition, they have the benefits of supporting a growing population density while maintaining quality of life, spreading the use of natural resources more efficiently, fostering healthy living, and providing grounds for innovation and evolution of cities. What are the key elements of an eco-district that lends itself to economic growth? Can eco-districts be implemented in NYC? How can the various stakeholders, from developers to community organizations, work together to foster regenerative sustainable neighborhoods? How can these projects be incentivized as well as funded?

Please RSVP events@sustainabilitypractice.net

PDQ icon  Urban Redevelopment - How the Eco-District Model can Drive Economic Growth
PDQ icon  Urban Redevelopment - How the Eco-District Model Can Drive Economic Growth
PDQ icon  Urban Redevelopment - How the Eco-District Model Can Drive Economic Growth?
Back to the Top
November 19 2013, 6-8 pm
..........................................................................................................................................
New York City's Road to Resiliency
..........................................................................................................................................
Host
NYU / Stern Social Enterprise Association

Venue: Bard College – 1150 Sixth Avenue (44 /45 Sts) 5th floor

Confirmed Panelists: Roland Lewis, President, Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance ; Adam Friedberg, Senior Sustainability Consultant, Principal Arup;

Invited Panelists: Daniel Zarrilli Director of Resiliency at NYC Office of the Mayor; Ernest Tollerson, Director, Environmental Sustainability & Compliance; Laurie Kerr, Director of the City Energy Project, Natural Resources Defense Council; Valerie Smith, Director Corporate Sustainability, Citigroup;

Moderator: Eban Goodstein, Director, Bard Center for Environmental Policy

Following the devastation from Hurricane Sandy on the New York City region, the second costliest hurricane in United States history, Mayor Bloomberg convened the Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) to "analyze the impacts of the storm on the city's buildings, infrastructure, and people; assess the risks the city faces from climate change in the medium term (2020s) and long term (2050s); and outline ambitious, comprehensive, but achievable strategies for increasing resiliency citywide."

In June, 2013, eight months after the storm, the Mayor's office released the updated version of PlaNYC: A Stronger, More Resilient New York. In the same month, Urban Green's Building Resiliency Task Force's Report "for making New York buildings and residents safer and better prepared for the next extreme weather event" was officially considered by the New York City Council Committee on Housing and Buildings.

The reports' proposals include suggestions on updating building codes, raising homes, minimizing wind damage, reassessing flood plains, controlling stormwater, planning reliable and flexible power systems, protecting and managing water resources, and improving emergency management procedures and systems. Further concerns such as food delivery systems, transportation services, healthcare accessibility, school closings / reopenings and government assistance access and availability also need to be addressed before the next major weather event.

Join our panel of experts to address the contents of these reports and access New York's progress in answering the critical questions: "Where were we?" "Where are we?" and "Where should we be?" before the next major storm.

Please RSVP events@sustainabilitypractice.net

PDQ icon  SPN: New York City’s Road to Resiliency
PDQ icon  Bard's NYC Resilliency Slides       13Mb download
Back to the Top
February 18 2014, 6-8 pm
..........................................................................................................................................
Environmental Policy Predictions NYC 2014
..........................................................................................................................................
Host
Bard College
Center for Environmental Policy

Venue: Bard College – 1150 Sixth Avenue (44 /45 Sts) 5th floor

Invited Panelists: Laurie Kerr, Director, City Energy Project, National Resources Defense Council; Cecil Scheib, Chief Program Director, Urban Green Council; Marcia Bystryn, Executive Director, New York League of Conservation Voters; Carter Strickland, Commissioner, NYC Department of Environmental Protection

Moderator: Eban Goodstein - Director, Bard Center for Environmental Policy

As Mayor de Blasio has begun to make appointments, the sustainability community is watching to see what his environmental agenda will be. How do Mayor de Blasio’s recent appointments align with his campaign’s “Framework for a Sustainable City”? What will it take to successfully translate his campaign rhetoric into the no nonsense business realities of NYC? Will Mayor de Blasio build on Bloomberg's environmental sustainability record? Will de Blasio’s track record as a city councilman translate into his environmental promises? Or with the economy still struggling will some environmental programs be scaled back?

Though climate change was not a sound bite during the campaign; environmental issues will likely gain more traction in the months ahead, especially after NYC recently experienced several of the worst winter storms on record, which many see as another harbinger of climate change.

Please join environmental experts in a discussion looking back at Bloomberg's environmental record and looking forward to de Blasio's environmental promises.

Please RSVP events@sustainabilitypractice.net

Back to the Top
April 16 2014, 6-8 pm
..........................................................................................................................................
'The Tale of Two Cities: Turning Rhetoric into Reality'
..........................................................................................................................................
Host
Baruch College
Robert Zicklin Center for Corporate Integrity

Venue: Baruch College's Library Building, 151 E 25th Street (between Lex and 3rd), Room 750

Panelists: Miquela Craytor, Vice President, Center for Economic Transformation, NYCEDC; June O’Neil - Professor of Economics Baruch College l CUNY Graduate Center, Wollman Distinguished Chair in Economics, Director of the Center for the Study of Business and Government at the Zicklin School of Business; David R. Jones, President, Community Service Society; Valerie Smith, Director Corporate Sustainability, Citigroup; Greg Larkin, Innovation Product Development, Bloomberg LLP;

Moderator: Nicole Gelinas, Searle Freedom Trust Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, Contributing Editor City Journal

Income inequality is the topic of the day globally, throughout the nation and in our city. The World Economic Forum's Global Risks 2014 report notes that "Widening gaps between the richest and poorest citizens threaten social and political stability as well as economic development." In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Obama said “…corporate profits and stock prices have rarely been higher, and those at the top have never done better. But average wages have barely budged. Inequality has deepened.” Here in New York City, Mayor de Blasio was elected in large-part due to his criticism of “the two New Yorks” and his promises to work to correct the increasing income disparity in this city.

What will it take to turn de Blasio’s rhetoric into reality? Can he substantially improve life in New York City for the nearly 2 million residents living below the poverty line? Can he protect and restore the disappearing middle class? Can the Mayor accomplish all of this without alienating Wall Street and keep the city solvent and avoid a repeat of the catastrophic budget failures that have plagued the city’s past? Join us on April 16th as the Sustainability Practice Network and Baruch College’s Robert Zicklin Center for Corporate Integrity convene a panel to address these questions and more.

Please RSVP events@sustainabilitypractice.net

Back to the Top
April 25 2014
..........................................................................................................................................
Anatomy of a Deal: Financing Sustainable Food
..........................................................................................................................................
Host
Slow Money NYC

The Sustainability Practice Network and Slow Money NYC would like to invite you to a Panel Discussion entitled, "Anatomy of a Deal: Financing Sustainable Food," April 25, 2014 from 2:00 - 3:30 pm at The Wythe Hotel, 80 Wythe Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211 (Screening Room, Cellar Level). RSVP and Buy Tickets Here.

This expert panel highlights a unique Case Study demonstrating how a sustainable food entrepreneur was able to successfully aggregate diverse funding from both Foundations and Investors. Central to the discussion will be an analysis of how entrepreneurs can address Three "E" Returns on Investment -- Equitable, Environmental and Economic -- to create the opportunity for this type of "integrated" financing for social enterprise.

In a rare glimpse of how a collaborative financing deal has been put together, we have assembled all of the parties who made the transaction a success:

The panel is part of a day-long Food + Enterprise Gathering on April 25, 2014 as part of 3rd Food Book Fair, exploring the potential for enhanced collaboration amongst multiple stakeholders aiming to change the local food system -- Entrepreneurs, Consultants, Foundations and Investors. Related events include an Entrepreneur Clinic and a Pitch Competition. Register for Day Pass Here.

Food + Enterprise has been planned with amazing partners such as Food Book Fair, Grow NYC, NRDC, Community Food Funders, Sustainable Agriculture and Food System Funders and the Sustainabilty Practice Network.

Back to the Top